https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/issue/feed Annals of Medical Physiology 2021-04-24T15:26:03+0530 Dr. Mohammed Abdul Hannan Hazari editor@amphysiol.com Open Journal Systems <p><strong><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">Annals of Medical Physiology</span></strong><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;"> (<em>Ann Med Physiol.</em>) is a double-blind peer-reviewed quarterly journal, published online, aims to provide the most complete and reliable source of information on current developments in the field of medical physiology. The emphasis will be on publishing quality research papers rapidly and keep freely available to researchers worldwide through </span><a title="Open Access Policy" href="https://amphysiol.com/amp/oa" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;"><span style="color: #0000ff;">open access policy</span></span></a><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">. All articles are freely available without charge to the user or his/her institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. <br /></span></p> <p><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;"> <strong>Annals of Medical Physiology</strong> serves an important role by encouraging, fostering and promoting developments in various areas of medical physiology. This journal publishes reviews, original research articles, brief communications in all areas of medical physiology.</span></p> <p><strong><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">Features:</span></strong></p> <ul type="disc"> <li class="show" style="margin: 0px 0px 8px; color: #000000; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">International quality</span></li> <li class="show" style="margin: 0px 0px 8px; color: #000000; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">Published quarterly (Jan-Mar, Apr-June, July-Sept, Oct-Dec)</span></li> <li class="show" style="margin: 0px 0px 8px; color: #000000; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">Online manuscript submission</span></li> <li class="show" style="margin: 0px 0px 8px; color: #000000; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="margin: 0px; line-height: 115%; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; font-size: 12pt;">Nominal publication charges</span></li> </ul> https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/44 Perception of data quality and Electronic health information system acceptance, reliability, and satisfaction: A study at tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia 2021-04-24T15:26:03+0530 Asim Mehmood assimrza@gmail.com Abdu Mohammad Aqeeli abduaqeeli@gmail.com Ali Musa assimrza@gmail.com Adulrahman Muhammad assimrza82@gmail.com Osamah Muhammad assimrza@hotmail.com <p>Electronic Health information systems (EHIS) are considered a backbone for healthcare planning and quality services. This study was designed to explore the acceptance, reliability, and satisfaction of the end users' experience with the hospital electronic health information system. We also investigated the perception of data quality by the users who were directly involved in data entry. we conducted a cross-sectional survey, and a questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data from different EHIS users. The questionnaire contained six sections: demographic user information, general HIS assessment, accessibility, and availability of computer terminals in the hospital, EHIS and the patient care, user satisfaction with the HIS and perception of data quality. Desktop computers were available throughout the hospital, but the hospital was lacking handheld computers or computers on the wheel. Participants of the study were satisfied with the data entry and retrieval process but there was lacking job training related to troubleshooting. EHIS users were not aware and prepared for the downtime of the system and procedures were also not clear to them. Regarding the perception of data quality, most of the participants responded that accurate data and complete data is of quality data. There is a need for proper technical support and enhance the hospital's networking speed for better response. Laptops and hand-held computers are the need of time for data entry in critical situations and during wards visit. This can also enhance the quality of data, and reduce the chances of data loss.</p> Copyright (c) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/41 How calyx juice of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Zobo) affects human platelet count 2021-01-25T22:08:05+0530 Emmanuel Izuchukwu Orji emmaking150@yahoo.com Chukwudi Onyeka Okonkwo co.okonkwo@unizik.edu.ng Lilian Obiageli Ozondu ozondulilian@gmail.com <p>“Zobo” is a popular local soft drink; made from the dried calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa; widely consumed across towns, cities and cultures in Nigeria. A lot of health benefits have been attributed to this drink, some of which include anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antihypertensive, hypocholesterolemic and antianemic effect. However, little is known on the effect of this refreshing drink on the human platelet count. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the impact of the Calx juice of Hibiscus sabdariffa “Zobo” on the platelet level on young adult, who make up the demography that consume the drink a lot. For the purpose of this study, the researches employed the local method of preparing the “Zobo” drink and 50 (24 females and 26 males) subjects, randomly selected, voluntarily participated in the study. The study lasted for a period of 14 days and samples were collected from subjects before and after the 14th day of taking 500ml of “Zobo” drink. Platelet count was determined in collected samples and the data obtained analyzed with paired sample T-test using SPSS (version 20). The result shows that there is a significant decrease (p&lt;0.05) in the posttest (162.72 ± 0.428×109/l) when compared to the pretest was (262.7 ± 0.371×109/l) in male subjects. For the Female group, the result also shows that there is a significant decrease (p&lt;0.05) in the posttest (204.30 ± 0.583×109/l) when compared with the pretest (258.20 ± 0.472×109/l). Conclusion was therefore reached that juice made from the dried calyces of hibiscus sabdriffa reduces the platelet count of participants in this study.</p> Copyright (c) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i4.28248 Evaluation of renal functions tests among Sudanese healthy pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) at The National Ribat University Hospital in Khartoum State in 2019 2020-12-29T21:57:19+0530 Ibrahim Abdelrhim Ali hemamedicine@gmail.com Elham Bourai Hassan Dribrahimali93@gmail.com Khalid S. Elhassan Ibrahimalimedicine@gmail.com <p>Pregnancy involves remarkable physiological changes and the functional impact of pregnancy on the kidney physiology is widespread involving practically all aspects of kidney functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal functions in Sudanese healthy pregnant ladies during different trimesters. A cross sectional study was carried out during July to October 2019 on Sudanese healthy pregnant ladies attending antenatal care at the National Ribat University Hospital in Khartoum State. The study covered 60 healthy pregnant ladies (20 for each trimester). The purpose of the study was explained to all participants and they were assessed after taking their consent. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) were measured by standard techniques. A sample of five ml venous blood was taken in a suitable blood container for measurement of urea and creatinine using a fully automated Mindray BS-300 Chemistry Analyzer (Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics Co., Ltd., Shenzhen, China). The data was analyzed using SPSS version 25 (IBM SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), t-test was used to compare the statistical significant (p value ? 0.05 was considered statistical significant). The mean age of participants was 26.6±5.3 years with the range of 18-37 years. The mean BMI was 25.7±3.6 with the range of 18-31. The mean urea in the first, second and third trimester was 13.4, 13.9 and 13.2 mg/dl respectively with no statistically significant variation. The mean creatinine in the first, second and third trimester was 0.6, 0.6 and 0.5 mg/dl respectively with no statistically significant variation. To conclude, there was no significant variation of serum urea and creatinine during three trimesters of pregnancy in healthy pregnant women.</p> 2021-01-15T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i3.14465 Emergence of MIS-C in COVID-19 pandemic 2020-12-29T21:21:26+0530 Mehnaaz Sameera Arifuddin mehnaaz@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com 2021-01-15T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i2.115684 Dyslipidemia is the hallmark of the metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women 2020-07-15T07:49:31+0530 Asim Alaaeldin Osman asim9517@gmail.com Ahmed Mohamed Fadlalla ahmedashazali@gmail.com <p>The incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) increases after menopause and may be due to changes in the plasma lipid-lipoprotein levels that occur following menopausal transition. Physiological estrogen withdrawal during menopause plays a major role in abnormal lipid metabolism such as elevated low-density lipoprotein concentration. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between dyslipidemia and the causative factors of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, 290 postmenopausal Sudanese women were included. Lipid profiles were measured by spectrophotometer, estrogen hormone determined by ELISA, insulin resistance determined by HOMA-2 calculator and lipid accumulation product was calculated by the following equation (waist circumference in cm X triglyceride concentration in mM). The results revealed that total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein levels and very low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly higher in the postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MS) in comparison to those without the MS. Elevated total cholesterol levels were seen in 51.7 %, elevated triglycerides were seen in 49.7% and elevated low-density lipoprotein levels were seen in 29.3% whereas reduced high density lipoprotein levels were seen in 16.89% of the postmenopausal women. Total cholesterol, triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein values showed a significant positive correlation with insulin resistance and lipid accumulation and a significant negative correlation with the estrogen hormone level. In addition, high density lipoproteins showed a significant negative correlation with lipid accumulation levels.</p> 2020-06-30T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i2.100521 Resting heart rate variability in regular yoga practitioners - A cross-sectional study 2020-07-13T09:36:07+0530 Selvakumar Subash drselvaphysiology@gmail.com Manikandan Sathiyaseelan manikandan2303@gmail.com Dayanalakshmi Ramachandran drdayanaselvakumar@gmail.com <p>Heart rate variability (HRV) is a useful and powerful non-invasive tool for quantitative assessment of cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies have shown that low heart rate variability is an indication of increased risk for cardiac diseases and sudden cardiac death. Yoga has been associated with improved cardio-respiratory performance. Thirty male regular yoga practitioners doing yoga for more than 3 years, age between 25-45 years (yoga group) and 30 male non-yoga practitioners, age-matched (control group) were included. A computerized Niviqure ECG system with HRV software was used for heart rate variability recording. Our results show that frequency-domain parameters like LF power, LF n.u, and LF/HF ratio were significantly lower in yoga group compared to control group. Time-domain parameters like mean RR, NN50, pNN50 were significantly higher in yoga group compared to control group. We conclude that the yoga increases heart rate variability by optimizing the autonomic functions, which is a good indicator of cardiac autonomic activity during rest.</p> 2020-06-30T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i1.94611 Effect of tea and coffee consumption on the blood pressure, pulse wave velocity and aortic pressures in young healthy individuals 2020-07-09T09:28:32+0530 Farah Fatima farah6531@gmail.com Mohammed Abdul Hannan Hazari hannanhazari@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com Mehnaaz Sameera Arifuddin mehnaaz@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com Syed Abdul Tahreem abdul.tahreem@gmail.com <p>Caffeine present in tea and coffee, the most commonly used beverages, has been implicated to have long term effects on cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to document the acute and chronic effects of tea and coffee consumption on blood pressure, pulse wave velocity and aortic pressures in young, healthy individuals. This observational study was conducted on 86 healthy MBBS student volunteers of both genders between the age group of 18-27 years. Cardiovascular parameters (heart rate, peripheral blood pressure, central blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, augmentation pressure) were measured using PeriScope™. Participants were divided into 3 groups based on their history of consuming tea/coffee/both/none. Data collected was analyzed using SPSS 17.0. ANOVA or Welsh test of equality of means was used for knowing the differences for scale variables. Paired sample t test was used to know the acute effect of coffee consumption among group 1 participants in a before-after design. In regular tea consumers, the bilateral brachial SBP, DBP and MAP were significantly higher than individuals who did not consume tea regularly; similar results in these parameters were also observed in regular coffee drinkers. However the lower limb arterial parameters were not markedly differently in tea/coffee group compared to non-drinkers. In both tea and coffee group, AoSP and AoDP were significantly higher than non-drinkers. Additionally, coffee drinking has acute stimulatory effects on CVS as evident by increase in peripheral and central vascular parameters.</p> 2020-06-30T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v4i1.120578 SARS-CoV-2 and ACE2 nexus 2020-07-08T04:56:07+0530 Mehnaaz Sameera Arifuddin mehnaaz@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com 2020-06-30T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2020 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v3i4.94415 Conflict of interest or competing interest: What is in the name? 2020-03-22T13:51:02+0530 Mohammed Abdul Hannan Hazari hannanhazari@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com <p>No abstract</p> 2019-12-31T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2019 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER) https://amphysiol.com/index.php/amp/article/view/v3i3.68136 Precision medicine in the era of live cell imaging 2019-10-05T05:19:47+0530 Mohammed Abdul Hannan Hazari hannanhazari@deccancollegeofmedicalsciences.com <p>-</p> 2019-10-03T00:00:00+0530 Copyright (c) 2019 Quench Academy of Medical Education and Research (QAMER)